Intellectual Property Blog

Special Announcement: US Copyright Registration Fee Changes

The United States Copyright Office (USCO) has announced a new fee schedule that went into effect on Friday, March 20, 2020. This follows a comprehensive cost study, an evaluation of budget requirements, and a review of previous proposals and public commentary. The changes are an attempt by the USCO to balance its expenses. Not all fees increased. Some decreased. And some, like group applications for photos, have remained the same. The most widely-affected cross-section of […]

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Paparazzi Sues J-Lo for Posting Photo on Instagram

Jennifer Lopez recently shared a photo of herself and soon-to-be husband Alex Rodriguez holding hands in front of a New York restaurant. The problem? The photo did not belong to her.  Although we usually see celebrities suing the paparazzi, in an odd twist, the photographer who took the picture is the party filing suit this time. In fact, this isn’t the first time the “paps” have sued a celeb, and it certainly won’t be the […]

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Information You Need To Know Before You File A Copyright Application

Filing a copyright application can seem like an easy process until you get stumped. So here are a few issues to think about before you complete the application: What type of work are you trying to register? Literary Work – books, poetry, directories, catalogs, computer programs Work of the Visual Arts – photos, fine, graphic and applied art; maps, technical drawings Sound Recording – audio recordings fixed in a phonorecord, CD, cassette, vinyl, audio tape […]

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Photographers and Owners of Copyright Registrations, Beware of State Sovereign Immunity Issues!

Photographers frequently encounter businesses and individuals who want to use their work without giving credit or paying for the right to use the photos. A pending copyright infringement case pending before the U.S. Supreme Court may make it easier for states to get away with this. Allen v. Cooper Allen v. Cooper, 139 S.Ct. 2664 (petition for certiorari granted June 3 2019) addresses the case of videographer and producer/director Rick Allen, who filmed the salvaging […]

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What Companies Should Know about International Copyright Law

Copyright protection assigns specific rights to its author as long as the work meets various criteria. The primary purpose of copyright protection is to encourage idea sharing and development. Copyright provides a framework for how relationships should work for everyone involved: copyright holders, content providers, and consumers of the content. With guidelines in place to benefit all parties, people have more incentives to share their creative works. When it comes to sharing work globally, the […]

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Copyright Contracts on Workplace Creations Stick – Even for Taylor Swift

Through every news and social platform, a quick search will yield limitless reports (and plenty of gossip) on Taylor Swift’s recent catalog purchase. The man who bought it for $300 million is the owner of her former label — and she is sickened. If there is anything to be learned from Swift’s copyright woes, her ordeal demonstrates the sticking power of copyright contracts on your creative work. According to copyright law, all transactions were officially […]

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